Contributors

Jillian Adams

Jillian Adams graduated with honours in Geography and majors in Literature and Journalism and Fine Arts then to Paris to study cooking. She is a graduate of Cordon Bleu in Paris and a qualified teacher. She completed a Masters in Oral History and Historical Memory at Monash University in 2011. In January 2012 Jillian commenced study towards her PhD at Central Queensland University in the School of Education and Creative Arts. Her PhD uses creative non-fiction, based on oral histories along with research into food writing in post-war Australia, to challenge the static and often nostalgic impressions of the housewife in the 1950s. She has co-edited a special edition of on-line journal MC, has published papers in numerous academic journals and presented papers at local and international conferences.

Avery Alexander

Avery Alexander is an undergraduate student in the Minor in Appalachian Studies program at the University of North Georgia. She is preparing to teach middle grades History in the public school system.

Kaitlin Brackett

Kaitlin Brackett is an undergraduate student in the Minor in Appalachian Studies program at the University of North Georgia. She is preparing to teach middle grades History in the public school system.

Teri Brewer

Teri Brewer is an independent folklorist and filmmaker working primarily in The UK and the western US. Her topics include folklife, archaeology and foodways. She serves as series editor for the Nevada Arts Council's Nevada Stories film series, and is the filmmaker for the Kumeyaay Arts and Values Project in California. Recently she has been acting course director for the MA in Archaeology for Screen Media at Bristol University in England.

Lacey Cornell

Lacey Cornell is a recent graduate of Western Kentucky University's Folk Studies and Anthropology Master's program. She has been interested in foodways for much of her life and starting in September, she will be a service member for Foodcorps with Searcy County School District in Marshall, Arkansas. Her research interests are focused on local food movements, community supported agriculture, and identity. True to form, Lacey seeks out ice cream wherever she goes, favoring banana ice cream, hot fudge, and brownie combinations.

Elizabeth Guzman

Elizabeth Guzman is an undergraduate student in the Minor in Appalachian Studies program at the University of North Georgia. She is majoring in History and has a special interest in Cherokee foodways.

Adrienne Johnson

Adrienne Johnson is a PhD student in Modern Thought and Literature at Stanford University. Her dissertation examines the history of medical advice literature, with particular attention to 20th century American folklore of diet and the body. Her areas of interest are food studies, US cultural history, and utopianism. Prior, Adrienne attended UC Berkeley, graduating summa cum laude in American Studies. She wrote her senior thesis on competitive eating and theories of the body.

Jeffrey Kallen

Jeffrey Kallen is an Associate Professor in Linguistics and Phonetics at Trinity College Dublin. Following an interdisciplinary BA in Folklore Studies (Fairhaven College, Western Washington University), he moved to Linguistics (MA, University of Washington) before doing a PhD on the English Language in Ireland (Trinity College Dublin). Though he works primarily with social and historical aspects of Irish English, his other research interests include the Linguistic Landscape (the use of visible language in public spaces) and aspects of semiotics which have included artwork, postage stamps, and foodways.

Rosann Kent

Rosann Kent is the Director of the Appalachian Studies program at the University of North Georgia. She has a master's degree in storytelling from East Tennessee State University.

Diana Lempel

Diana Lempel is a PhD student in Landscape Studies at Harvard University. Her work investigates how communities live meaningful lives connected to place, and how the dining table connects the pleasures and labors of harvesting resources with those of domestic social life.

Mary Lipold

Mary Lipold is an undergraduate student in the Minor in Appalachian Studies program at the University of North Georgia. After graduation she hopes to be employed as an environmental educator with a non-profit association.

Edward Millar

Edward Millar, of New Jersey, recently completed a MA in Folklore at Memorial University. His research largely draws from issues relating to personal and cultural identity. His interests include cultural tourism, occupational folklife, folklore and literature, and folklore and technology. Lately, he has thought of returning pen to paper.

Laura Sanchini

Laura is a writer and folklorist from Montreal. She currently works as an oral historian at the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 in Halifax and is a Ph.D. candidate in folklore at Memorial University where she is writing her thesis on folk artists in Cape Breton. Her research interests include material culture, foodways, and identity.

Sarah C. Wyer

Sarah C. Wyer is a graduate student in Folklore and Arts Management at the University of Oregon. Her focus is in public folklore with interests in authenticity, foodways, gender, and how folk culture and popular culture contribute to identity formation. A native of San Diego, California, Sarah worked in the historic preservation and cultural heritage sector in her hometown before moving to Eugene, Oregon to pursue her education. Her B.A. is in Anthropology and Folklore.