Editors


Janet Gilmore

Janet C. Gilmore is Professor in Folklore and Planning & Landscape Architecture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she focuses on foodways and cultural landscapes. Pacific Northwestern, western Great Lakes, and upper Mississippi River fishing people, maritime workers, folk artists, and farming people led her to publish, present, and contribute to exhibits and festivals that relate to the regions’ foodways and food landscapes— indigenous, old immigrant, and new immigrant. Personal interests in food, cooking, and cookbooks, inspired early in her western Oregon home, have now come full circle as she explores her mother’s and grandmother’s Pacific Northwestern-Upper Midwestern food legacies.

Dustin Knepp

M. Dustin Knepp is an Associate Professor at California State University, Bakersfield. Current Chair of the Modern Languages and Literatures Department, he directs the Interdisciplinary Studies programs on campus. His research investigates the intersection of food and culture in Latino life, with particular attention to tamales and holiday food traditions and their impact through familial generations and in the historic record. He also served for a year as a local food critic, sampling and reviewing restaurants and food scenes in Bakersfield. Dustin has published his research across a variety of traditional and digital platforms, and he has contributed to food scholarship through various articles and written contributions, a digital trilingual English/Spanish/Kaqchikel food dictionary, and a short video documentary featuring Bakersfield’s community tamalada. 

Michael Lange

Michael A. Lange is Professor in the interdisciplinary Core Curriculum at Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont. He is the author of Norwegian Scots: An Anthropological Interpretation of Viking-Scottish identity in the Orkney Islands (2007) and Meanings of Maple (2017), as well as several chapters and articles in journals such as Anatolia, Scandinavian-Canadian Studies, and Voices: The Journal of New York Folklore. He has conducted research in Scotland, Norway, Morocco, and several parts of the US.

Jennifer Dutch, Book Reviews

Jennifer Rachel Dutch is an Assistant Professor of English and Chair of the English Department at York College of Nebraska. She received her PhD in American Studies from the Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg, and Master’s degree in English from the University of New Hampshire. Her book Look Who’s Cooking: The Rhetoric of American Home Cooking Traditions in the Twenty-First Century was published by the University Press of Mississippi in 2018. Her research focuses on the intersection of innovation and tradition in food production and consumption, particularly related to cooking at home and on YouTube.



Board Members


Yvonne Lockwood

Yvonne R. Lockwood is folklife curator emerita at the Michigan State University Museum, East Lansing, and a former editor of Digest. Her research interests are on ethnic foodways, material culture, and history in Europe and the United States and have resulted in numerous publications.

Lucy M. Long

Director of the independent non-profit Center for Food and Culture, Bowling Green, Ohio, Lucy M. Long (PhD, Folklore, University of Pennsylvania) is an adjunct assistant professor at Bowling Green State University where she teaches folklore, food studies, ethnic studies, and tourism. She has edited and authored numerous foodways publications, including Culinary Tourism (2004), Regional American Food Culture (2009), Ethnic American Food Today: A Cultural Encyclopedia (2015), Ethnic American Cooking: Recipes for Living In a New World (2016); The Food and Folklore Reader (2015); Comfort Food Meanings and Meals (2017), and Honey: A Global History (2017).

LuAnne Roth

Senior Lecturer in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Rhode Island, LuAnne Roth's research and teaching focus on folklore, film/media, and food studies. Her food studies writing has appeared in the journals DigestWestern Folklore, and Food, Culture and Society, and as chapters in such volumes as What's Eating You?:  Food and Horror on Screen (2017), Comfort Food Meanings and Memories (2017), Unsettling Assumptions: Tradition, Gender, Drag (2014), and Folklore/Cinema: Popular Film as Vernacular Culture (2007). Particularly interested in how food is used to negotiate ideology related to class, ethnicity, gender, and race, Roth is currently preparing a print and e-book manuscript, “Talking Turkey,” which interrogates media representations of the Thanksgiving meal, along with an article that addresses culinary nationalism and racism in America.  https://harrington.uri.edu/meet/luanne-k-roth/

Robert James Smith

Dr. Robert James Smith is a professor of English Education at Southern Cross University in Australia. He is one of the Editors of the scholarly journal Australian Folklore. In addition to foodways, his research interests include contemporary memorial customs, humour within the school classroom, and regional folk culture.

Diane Tye

Diane Tye is Professor in the Department of Folklore, Memorial University. She researches intersections of folklore and gender, especially as they relate to foodways. She is author of Baking as Biography. A Life Story in Recipes (McGill-Queen’s UP, 2010) and co-editor with Pauline Greenhill of Unsettling Assumptions. Gender, Tradition, Drag (Utah State UP, 2014).

Theresa A. Vaughan

Professor in the Department of Humanities and Philosophy at the University of Central Oklahoma, Theresa Vaughan co-edited The Encyclopedia of Women’s Folklore and Folklife (with Liz Locke and Pauline Greenhill), and her recent research combines her interest in women’s folklore with foodways and the medieval world. Her forthcoming book Balancing the Humors: Dietary Recommendations for Women in the Middle Ages is scheduled for publication in 2019 or 2020. 

Katrina Wynn

Katrina Wynn is currently a stay at home mom after finishing up her five and a half year contract position as manager of the Northeast Archives of Folklore and Oral History at the University of Maine. She has held that position since graduating from Western Kentucky University with a MA in Folk Studies. Katrina is the senior co-convener of the American Folklore Society’s Foodways Section and has been a member of the section since starting graduate school.



Contributors


Charles Camp

Charles Camp is the author of the foodways classic American Foodways: What, When, Why and How We Eat In America (August House, 1989), and curator of Key Ingredients: America by Food (http://www.keyingredients.org), the Smithsonian Institution’s traveling exhibition that has toured the United States since c. 2005.

Susan Eleuterio

Susan Eleuterio is a professional folklorist and educator. One great grandmother was Brazilian Portuguese, and a set of grandparents emigrated from the Azores to the United States. She researched and contributed a number of essays to Ethnic American Food Today: A Cultural Encyclopedia, and the companion cookbook, Ethnic American Cooking: Recipes for Living In A New World, both edited by Lucy M. Long. She collaboratively authored “Even Presidents Need Comfort Food; Tradition, Food and Politics at the Valois Cafeteria” in Comfort Food, Meanings and Memories (University Press of Mississippi, 2017), edited by Michael Owen Jones and Lucy M. Long.

Sandra Hudd

Sandra Hudd is a University Associate in the School of Humanities, University of Tasmania, Australia. She is author of The Site of the Convent of the Holy Infant Jesus in Singapore: Entwined Histories of a Colonial Convent and a Nation, 1854-2015 (2016). She can be contacted at sandra.hudd@utas.edu.au

C. Julián Idrobo

C. Julián Idrobo is Assistant Professor at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Development Studies at Los Andes University, Bogotá, Colombia. By bringing together ethnobiology, political ecology, and social wellbeing, his research examines the role of biodiversity and local knowledge and the associated adaptation of small-scale communities to environmental change. His research takes place in coastal areas of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and the Colombian Pacific.

Cherry Levin

A professional wedding planner in the San Francisco Bay Area currently working on a book about wedding traditions, Cherry Levin earned a Master's Degree in Folklore at University of California, Berkeley where she studied under Alan Dundes. Her dissertation, “Wedding Belles and Enslaved Brides: Plantation Weddings in Fact, Fiction, and Folklore,” was written under the guidance of Frank deCaro and Carolyn Ware at Louisiana State University.

Lucy M. Long

Digest Board member and Director of the independent non-profit Center for Food and Culture, Bowling Green, Ohio, Lucy M. Long (PhD, Folklore, University of Pennsylvania) is an adjunct assistant professor at Bowling Green State University where she teaches folklore, food studies, ethnic studies, and tourism. She has edited and authored numerous foodways publications, including Culinary Tourism (2004), Regional American Food Culture (2009), Ethnic American Food Today: A Cultural Encyclopedia (2015), Ethnic American Cooking: Recipes for Living In a New World (2016); The Food and Folklore Reader (2015); Comfort Food Meanings and Meals (2017), and Honey: A Global History (2017).

Michael A. Meer

A lawyer and amateur culinary historian. Michael A. Meer holds a Dr. iur/JSD degree (summa cum laude) from the University of Bern and an LLM degree from New York University School of Law. He has published professionally in the fields of intellectual property and international contract laws.

Claire Schmidt

A native of Wisconsin with a BA in English from University of Wisconsin-Madison, Claire Schmidt is an assistant professor of English at Missouri Valley College where she teaches courses in world literature, film criticism, British literature, and writing, and serves as director of the Honors Program. Schmidt received her PhD and MA in Folklore Studies from University of Missouri-Columbia; her research interests include occupational folklore, humor studies, foodways, and Anglo Saxon literature. University of Wisconsin Press has just published her book, If You Don't Laugh You'll Cry: The Occupational Humor of White Wisconsin Prison Workers (2017) in the Folklore Studies in a Multicultural World series.

Kylie Schroeder

Kylie Schroeder received her M.A. from Utah State University’s Folklore Program in 2018, where her thesis research examined the constraints of local haunted heritage tourism. Originally from Kaukauna, Wisconsin, she completed her undergraduate work in Anthropology and Folklore at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Other research interests include culinary tourism and digital folklore.

Tallen Sloane

Tallen Sloane earned her Master of Letters in Folklore and Ethnology from the University of Aberdeen in 2016 where she wrote about women's multivalent expressions of vernacular Judaism in “Miriam's Daughters: Narratives of Jewish Ethnicity, Religion, and Community in the NorthEast of Scotland.” When not waxing poetic about food as medicine, she writes about the intersections of food, feminism, and health for online publications such as Lilith Magazine (“How Aberdeen Shaped My Jewish Feminism”), To Market Magazine (“A League of Their Own”), and Comestible Journal (“Stewards of the Sea: Female Conservationists in the Fisheries of New England”). You can find her in Boston facilitating workshops and organizing support groups for women with endometriosis and talking food policy. 

Robert James Smith

Robert James Smith is a teacher-educator who has long had an interest in food studies, particularly in vernacular food and identity. He is now editor of the annual Australian Folklore.

Nicole Tarulevicz

Nicole Tarulevicz is a Senior Lecturer in History and Asian Studies in the School of Humanities, University of Tasmania, Australia. She is author of Eating Her Curries and Kway: A Cultural History of Food in Singapore (2013), and is currently working on a cultural history of food safety in Singapore. She can be contacted at nicole.tarulevicz@utas.edu.au

Katherine L. Turner

Katherine L. Turner is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, British Columbia. Her research examines the relationships between local food systems and development projects, focusing on how gastronomy and local biodiversity have become key focus areas for many rural and regional development initiatives.